How The Birth House Embodies Feminism

Feminism: The advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of sexes (Feminism).

The Birth House, written by Ami McKay is a historical novel that is told from the point of view of a young seventeen year old girl, named Dora Rare. As she embarks on her journey, she shares her opinions on the various different people in her small town known as the Bay. Ami McKay introduced a wide variety of different characters throughout this text and allows opportunity for analyzing. Below in the embedded video, is my opinion on the idea of feminism and how I analyze the Feminist Literary Theory throughout the novel.

(Youtube)

“We cannot all succeed when half of us are held back.”        – Malala Yoursafai

Works Cited

Bialkowska, Karolina. “Ami McKay: the Birth House.” Women’s Post N.p., 23 Apr. 2014, http://www.womenspost.ca/ami-mckay-the-birth-house/. Accessed 20 July 2017.

“Feminism.” English Oxford Living Dictionaries. N.p., n.d., en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/feminism. Accessed 20 July 2017.

Hughes, Kathryn. “Gender Roles in the 19th Century.” The British Library.The British Library, 15 May 2014, www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/gender-roles-in-the-19th-century. Accessed 20 July 2017.

Lawrence, Jen. “Midwifery and Magic: A Review of The Birth House.” Literary Mama. N.p., Oct. 2006, www.literarymama.com/reviews/archives/2006/10/midwifery-and-magic.html. Accessed 20 July 2017.

McKay, Ami. The Birth House. Toronto: Vintage Canada, 2006. Print.

Sungrab, Tenzin. “Women’s Rights before, during, and after WWI in Canada.” Ontario Human Rights Commission. N.p., n.d., www.ohrc.on.ca/en/women%E2%80%99s-rights-during-and-after-wwi-canada. Accessed 20 July 2017.

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